Why ignoring mental health needs of young Syrian refugees could harm us all?

Dr. Zaher Sahloul

When a seven-year-old student in eastern Aleppo was asked at the peak of the bombardment campaign by the Assad regime in 2015 to draw a picture, he did not draw children playing, nor did he draw a blue sky or a smiling sun. Instead, Ahmad drew helicopters dropping barrel bombs, houses blazing in fire and mutilated dead children in blood. In his drawing, the dead children had smiles on their faces, while those alive were in tears.

Syrian Child Refugees Taught to Release Stress and Resist Recruitment

By Sally Hayden

The screams of a dozen Syrian and Palestinian children pierce the air of a community centre in Lebanon’s Shatila refugee camp. Yet the children are not hurt. They are yelling to express the anger and fear they feel as victims of conflict in special “peace education” classes.

Fever

By Jeremy Hugh Baron

Descriptions by patients of their own diseases are always interesting, especially as poems. In February 960 the poet al-Mutanabbi developed while in Egypt a fever that left him delirious after each nightly attack, beginning with fever and rigors, and ending with copious sweating. He compares the fever to a coy maiden who will visit him under cover of darkness.

New tool measures resilience in adolescent Syrian refugees

By Mike Cummings

Researchers from Yale University, together with partners at universities in Canada, Jordan, and the United Kingdom, have developed a brief and reliable survey tool to measure resilience in children and adolescents who have been displaced by the brutal conflict in Syria.