Hadrian’s Syrians

Written by Charles O. Cecil

Once a station for soldiers and sentries, the excavated ruins of milecastle 39 now beckon hikers roughly midway along Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland, England. From the early second century, the east-to-west wall separated Roman Britannia from Pictish tribes in Caledonia (in present-day Scotland) to the north. Not only stones did the work: Up to 8,000 men from all parts of the Roman Empire guarded and maintained the fortification along its 118-kilometer length. They included Syrians, as evidenced in the bilingual inscriptions—in Latin and Palmyrene—at the base of the tombstone found near South Shields, below, a commemoration of 30-year-old Regina, from central Britannia, by her bereaved husband, Barates, from Palmyra.  

Bestiality in the American Army

By Adnan Mouhiddin

This photo caught my attention for various reasons. I noticed on various occasions a general understanding among many Americans I came across (the vast majority are religious Christians and/or conservatives) on the social networks or even reality who refer to Arabs and Muslims as Camel riders and goats and sheep shaggers. The soldier in this photo is seemingly one of them.

The Ambassadors

Painting by Hans Holbein in 1533. This picture memorialises two wealthy, educated and powerful young men. On the left is Jean de Dinteville, aged 29, French ambassador to England in 1533. To the right stands his friend, Georges de Selve, aged 25, bishop of Lavaur, who acted on several occasions as ambassador to the Emperor, the Venetian Republic and the Holy See.

Egypt – Government Defence Anti-Corruption 2015

By Adnan Mouhiddin

I conducted this research for ‘Transparency International Defence and Security’. It supplied the ‘Government Defence Anti-Corruption Index 2015’ with assessment and analysis of the corruption risk in the Egyptian defence and security establishments in five key risk areas: political, financial, personnel, operations and procurement.