Syriology

Everything about Syria... And the 'ology' bits...

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Dr. Zaher Sahloul

When a seven-year-old student in eastern Aleppo was asked at the peak of the bombardment campaign by the Assad regime in 2015 to draw a picture, he did not draw children playing, nor did he draw a blue sky or a smiling sun. Instead, Ahmad drew helicopters dropping barrel bombs, houses blazing in fire and mutilated dead children in blood. In his drawing, the dead children had smiles on their faces, while those alive were in tears.

By Adnan Mouhiddin

Breaking up with someone close to you is an awful feeling that is experienced at least once in life time and sometimes this might extend to various times. Depending on the reason of which the break-up happened, it (the break up) is often associated with the most negative feelings someone might go through.

By Jeremy Hugh Baron

Descriptions by patients of their own diseases are always interesting, especially as poems. In February 960 the poet al-Mutanabbi developed while in Egypt a fever that left him delirious after each nightly attack, beginning with fever and rigors, and ending with copious sweating. He compares the fever to a coy maiden who will visit him under cover of darkness.

By Maanvi Singh

In different cultures, the source of that strength can be very different. That’s the finding in a study published in the journal Child Development. The researchers interviewed Syrian tweens and teens who had been displaced because of war.